​​National Farm Safety and Health ​​Week Celebrations Include Photo Contest

 

NFSHW 2016 logo

The National Tractor Safety Coalition says each year nearly 100 farmers die on the job from tractor overturns, and almost all of these deaths could have been prevented by retrofitting those tractors with a rollover protective structure (ROPS) like the one shown in the attached image. Photo courtesy CDC/NIOSH/CROPS. Download image.

The Tennessee Agricultural Safety and Health Partnership is conducting a social media photo contest from now until September 16. The partnership is looking for the best photos representing farm safety and health. Go to the Tennessee Agricultural Health and Safety Partnership Facebook page for more details.​ 

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – Did you know farming is among the most dangerous occupations and that most farm-related injuries are caused by machinery? Rollovers are the leading cause of serious injuries. The National Tractor Safety Coalition says each year nearly 100 farmers die on the job from tractor overturns, and almost all of these deaths could have been prevented by retrofitting those tractors with a rollover protective structure (ROPS). ROPS are 99.9 percent effective in preventing injuries and death from a tractor overturn.

The Tennessee Agricultural Safety and Health Partnership involves multiple organizations and has the statewide focus to promote farm safety and health. In advance of National Farm Safety & Health Week (which is September 18 – 24), the partnership is conducting a social media photo contest from now until September 16. The partnership is looking for the best photos representing farm safety and health. Go to the Tennessee Agricultural Health and Safety Partnership Facebook page for more details.

The partners include Tennessee Farmer’s Cooperative, University of Tennessee Extension, Tennessee AgrAbility, the Tennessee Department of Agriculture and the Tennessee Department of Health, Tennessee Farm Bureau, Tennessee State University Extension, Tennessee New Farmer Academy, UT Knoxville College of Nursing, University of Kentucky College of Nursing, and the USDA- Farm Service Agency and Natural Resources Conservation Services. 

The partnership’s theme this year is "Take the High Road- Safety" says Eileen Legault, with Tennessee AgrAbility.  “We want all Tennesseans to think safety first. Make safety a priority, follow safe work practices and set good examples for others to prevent incidents on your farm. Farming consistently ranks in the top three most hazardous jobs. Almost every farmer knows of a person killed or injured on a farm.”

Legault says, “Taking a ride on tractors, combines or ATVs seems exciting to many young kids, but it is not safe. Sometimes grandparents say that my kids always rode with me and nothing bad ever happened to them. But year after year, we see life changing injuries to kids from farm vehicles, and no parent ever thinks it will be their child.” 

However, tractors are responsible for 41 percent of the accidental farm deaths of children under 15, yet four out of five farm children regularly ride tractors with family members. This year’s National theme is Farm Safety: A Legacy to be Proud of”. Safety on the farm can save lives…..  Make one seat, one rider….a rule to live by every day.  

Legault adds, “You can spend quality time with a child doing lots of other things rather than riding farm machinery.”

For those wishing to learn more about safety and health on the farm, the National Education Center for Agricultural Safety (NECAS) at Northeast Iowa Community College’s (NICC) Peosta campus will be sponsoring webinars during National Farm Safety & Health Week. The webinars are scheduled for each day of the week at noon (CDT) and available online at www.necasag.org.   
 
They will cover the following themes:
 
Monday - AgrAbility
Tuesday – Health
Wednesday - Children’s Day
Thursday – Confined Spaces
Friday – Underground Utilities
 
NECAS also invites everyone to join them for 'AgChat' on Tuesday, Sept. 20, from 7 - 9 p.m. (CDT)
 
Additional information about NECAS is available online at 
www.necasag.org

The Partnership thanks the Tennessee Farmers Cooperative for donating prizes for the photo contest.

Through its mission of research, teaching and service, the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture (UTIA) touches lives and provides Real. Life. Solutions. ag.tennessee.edu​
 
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Contact: 

Eileen Legault, Tennessee AgrAbility/University of Tennessee Extension, 865-200-4527, elegault@utk.edu

 
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