Home Canned Tomatoes
​Protect your home canned or commercially canned foods from freezing.

​With the cold weather, more than just your pipes can freeze.  Canned foods stored in unheated or poorly heated areas like garages, basements, etc. can freeze also.  If canned foods have frozen, they may still be safe to eat.  Follow these guidelines from Cornell University Cooperative Extension:

 

Metal Cans

  • If the seams are still intact, the food is safe to use.  Thaw gradually and store at room temperature.
  • If the seam has broken and the food has thawed to room temperature, it should be discarded.
  • If the seam has broken and the food is still cold (refrigerator temperature or below), it may be safely salvaged.  Transfer it to a container and either store it in the refrigerator or refreeze for future use.

Glass Jars

  • If jars have cracked or broken during freezing, the food should not be used.
  • If the seal is still intact, the food is safe to use.  Thaw gradually and store at room temperature.  Recheck the seals after thawing.
  • If the seal has broken and food has thawed to room temperature, it should be discarded.
  • If the seal has broken and food is still cold (refrigerator temperature or below), it may be safely salvaged.  Store in the refrigerator or refreeze for future use.

General

  • All food that has frozen in cans or jars should be examined carefully for spoilage before use.  For an extra margin of safety, boil low-acid foods (meat, fish, poultry, vegetables) for 10 minutes before using.
  • Discard any product with off-color or odor.  DO NOT TASTE food that looks or smells suspicious.
  • Texture changes of canned vegetables and pasta may occur during freezing.  Although mushy, these foods are safe to eat if the can is intact and not swollen.

 

Just like you protect your pipes from freezing, keep your canned foods safe this winter and bring them inside to heated areas.